Weekly Feature



2018-06-07 / Editorial

Out of the Past

25 Years Ago June 10, 1993


CAZENOVIA CREEK— West Seneca’s creeks and streams have an amazing history in their own right. Along with containing thousands of years of prehistoric history in their eroded banks, numerous people from the past settled along these natural highways and water sources. Cazenovia Creek was named by surveyor Joseph Elliott in 1799 in honor of Holland Land Company agent Theophilis Cazenove. Along its shores lived Native Americans and later, members of the Ebenezer Society. During the Civil War, it was a route on the underground railroad for escaping slaves. More recently, the flatlands were used for agriculture as can be seen in this photograph from the 1940s taken near the Leydecker Road Bridge. 
Photo and caption courtesy of Jim Pace, West Seneca town historian CAZENOVIA CREEK— West Seneca’s creeks and streams have an amazing history in their own right. Along with containing thousands of years of prehistoric history in their eroded banks, numerous people from the past settled along these natural highways and water sources. Cazenovia Creek was named by surveyor Joseph Elliott in 1799 in honor of Holland Land Company agent Theophilis Cazenove. Along its shores lived Native Americans and later, members of the Ebenezer Society. During the Civil War, it was a route on the underground railroad for escaping slaves. More recently, the flatlands were used for agriculture as can be seen in this photograph from the 1940s taken near the Leydecker Road Bridge. Photo and caption courtesy of Jim Pace, West Seneca town historian • Superintendent Dr. Vincent Coppola said he’s never seen anything quite like the final results of the West Seneca budget vote last week. “I knew we were in for a rough time, but to have 3,700 people come out and vote no...,” said Coppola, speaking of the thrashing the budget received last Wednesday. “It wasn’t a total surprise, though. Last year was a clear signal,” he added, referring to the 2,600 people who voted against the budget when it was submitted for a second time last year, the day before school started. In terms of numbers, District Clerk Dolores Mendolia said she thought the 3,707-1,917 final margin might have set a record for voter turn-out in a first election. The district has had as many as 10,000 march to the polls for a second budget vote in the fall, she said.

• A bird in hand may be worth two in the bush to most people, but to Steve Martin it’s a whole lot more. Martin — no, not the comedian — is a world-renowned bird trainer and behaviorist and he is coming to the West Seneca Senior Citizens Center, 4620 Seneca St., from 1-4 p.m. this Saturday to talk about how people can better understand our fair feathered friends. Martin has been training birds and animals for 17 years and has been involved with birds in some respect for as long as he can remember. “I used to work for a veterinarian in California, just helping out with the animals. That’s when I met Ray Burwick, who was an animal trainer for films and had trained all of the birds in Hitchcock’s ‘The Birds,’” Martin said.

Return to top