Weekly Feature



2018-03-08 / Editorial

Out of the Past


WEST SENECA EAST SENIOR HIGH CONSTRUCTION — As the population of the Town of West Seneca rapidly grew in the 1950s and 1960s, so did the need for additional school buildings. In 1968, construction began for a new high school at 4760 Seneca St. by contractor Wright and Kremers. Pictured in August of 1968 is the metal framing for the new West Seneca East Senior High School. The first senior class to attend for a full school year graduated in 1971. 
Photo and caption courtesy of Jim Pace, West Seneca town historian WEST SENECA EAST SENIOR HIGH CONSTRUCTION — As the population of the Town of West Seneca rapidly grew in the 1950s and 1960s, so did the need for additional school buildings. In 1968, construction began for a new high school at 4760 Seneca St. by contractor Wright and Kremers. Pictured in August of 1968 is the metal framing for the new West Seneca East Senior High School. The first senior class to attend for a full school year graduated in 1971. Photo and caption courtesy of Jim Pace, West Seneca town historian 25 Years Ago
March 11, 1993

In coming years, the 40-unit townhouse development planned on Indian Church Road should be more attractive than the possible alternatives, according to the West Seneca Town Board. The board unanimously approved the development, proposed for the south side of Indian Church Road near Adelphia Cable, after listening to a team of professionals explain modifications to a plan originally rejected by the planning board. “We’re going to have a better chance to have things done right with this project as opposed to a light industrial building,” Trustee Barbara Rudnicki said.

Twenty four years as the “tax man” of West Seneca is enough for James Cummins. Cummins, 73, has been elected six times as the town’s receiver of taxes, but will not seek a seventh term in November. A Republican, Cummins said he has always taken pride in the fact that he is easy to work with. “I’ve got a good rapport with everyone,” he said. “Everybody has been so nice to me, too.”

Stevie Ray Shannon, a 1978 West Seneca West graduate now living in Amherst, is no teenager. He’s no stranger to the idea that a really great break might take a lot of work and time, and he is knowledgeable about the roots of country music. A self-professed Elvis fan, Shannon, who has changed his name since high school, is building his career in the area, using local talent to help in the production of his work, and building local fans through the help of country music radio stations.

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