Weekly Feature



2018-02-08 / Editorial

Out of the Past

25 Years Ago Feb. 11, 1993


ST. CATHERINE OF SIENA — In 1970, St. Catherine of Siena Church at 4928 Seneca St. was opened. Worshipping for a time in the old town hall at 4620 Seneca St., the congregation grew to well over 1,000 families. Closed in 2008 as part of the Diocese of Buffalo’s reorganization, the building now houses the Life Church. This photograph shows the groundbreaking ceremonies in 1968. 
Photo and caption courtesyof Jim Pace,West Seneca town historian ST. CATHERINE OF SIENA — In 1970, St. Catherine of Siena Church at 4928 Seneca St. was opened. Worshipping for a time in the old town hall at 4620 Seneca St., the congregation grew to well over 1,000 families. Closed in 2008 as part of the Diocese of Buffalo’s reorganization, the building now houses the Life Church. This photograph shows the groundbreaking ceremonies in 1968. Photo and caption courtesyof Jim Pace,West Seneca town historian Air samples have been taken at the West Seneca Educational Center, but results from the tests likely won’t be available until Friday. The work, prompted by complaints from parents of children at the Orchard Park Road school, was completed last Friday while the school was shut down and the school’s print shop was running at full steam. Once the results are in, they will be handed to Nellie Brown, an expert in the analysis of such data, from Cornell University.

Two Democrats have expressed interest in the West Seneca Town Council seats that will be up for grabs in November, while another is a possibility. Former town councilman and town Democratic chairman Christopher Walsh said he is seeking one of two Democratic nominations for the seats, as is Deputy Commissioner of the Erie County Department of Emergency Services Robert Schultz. Walsh said Daniel Krawczyk, a part-time animal control officer with the town, also might try for a seat.

Residents in the area surrounding a proposed West Seneca Developmental Disabilities Service Office group home on Barnett Drive voiced opposition to the plan, and the town board backed them up Monday night. The meeting room at town hall was filled with residents from homes near the Tobey Hill subdivision home at 34 Barnett, many of whom did not want to see the home sold to the state. DDSO officials planned to use the home as a residence for five adults with developmental disabilities.

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