Weekly Feature

2017-06-15 / Front Page

Oldenburg named superintendent of Tonawanda City Schools

by JENNIFER WATERS
Editor


Oldenburg Oldenburg After 11 years of viewing West Seneca as a second home, Deputy Superintendent Timothy Oldenburg has resigned from his position to become superintendent of schools for the Tonawanda City School District.

During his 11 years with the West Seneca Central School District, Oldenburg has worn many hats.

He was hired as an assistant principal at East Senior High School and spent three years in that position before being promoted to director of career and technical education and academy programs. In the last of his six years as director, Oldenburg also served as the interim high school principal of the Alternative Learning Center.

Two years ago, he was promoted to assistant superintendent for administrative services. He completes his tenure with the district as deputy superintendent.

“I congratulate the students, staff and families of West Seneca for another successful school year and wish them the very best in 2017 and 2018,” Oldenburg said.

In his efforts to serve students, Oldenburg said he has fostered invaluable community partnerships.

“West Seneca has meant something to me, and I’m happy to have served in all the roles that have been afforded. I hope in some way that I have been able to support the district, the programs, the students, families and staff here, in a meaningful way,” Oldenburg said.

Oldenburg said the West Seneca district employs a dedicated, loyal and committed staff.

“It has been my pleasure to not only serve this community and school system, but to have worked closely with these colleagues,” he said.

Oldenburg holds a doctorate in educational leadership from D’You- ville College, a master’s degree in educational leadership from Niagara University, a master’s degree in business administration from Medaille College, and a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University at Buffalo.

Kate Newton, president of the West Seneca Board of Education, said the board will work with interim superintendent Whitney Vantine to arrange plans for the future of the district’s administration.

“The West Seneca Board of Education wishes Dr. Timothy Oldenburg much success and all the best in his new position as superintendent of schools of the Tonawanda City School District,” Newton said.

Oldenburg said he is looking forward to giving back to the Tonawanda school community.

“It’s an exciting opportunity to be able to serve as a superintendent of schools, and to do it in a community in which I have many strong family ties,” he said. “Serving is a unique opportunity for anyone and most certainly for myself and my family.”

Recently, Tonawanda has been focused on a STEAM initiative, or science, technology, engineering, arts and math. Oldenburg said he plans to expand the district’s investment in innovative programs and continue to connect with community groups and experts in the industry.

“They have really invested in this initiative and are seeing some tremendous results,” he said. “It’s critically important to expose students to these 21st century skills and to best prepare them for jobs, employment, careers — some of which aren’t even discovered yet.”

Oldenburg graduated from North Tonawanda High School, creating a familiar and friendly rivalry in his new position. “That’s like East versus West — North Tonawanda and Tonawanda,” he said with a laugh.

His parents graduated from Tonawanda and were high school sweethearts, and his grandfather served as chief of police for the city.

“My grandmother was a dental hygienist at the high school when they had those positions,” Oldenburg said. “My parents are the only two in the family to move out of the City of Tonawanda, or, to ‘cross the canal’ as I say.”

He recalled memories from growing up in Tonawanda - his grandparents’ house, watching Fourth of July fireworks on the Niagara River, Canalfest and family picnics.

“It’s a real meaningful opportunity for me to be able to support and lead the Tonawanda City Schools,” Oldenburg said.

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